A glorious late afternoon walk today. The air crisp and filled with the scent of a fire. The sunset was spectacular. The pink-orange light first lightly touching the tops of the trees. Then, as the sun dipped lower, applying a blush to the underside of the clouds. Fleeting of course as sunsets tend to be. Such a beautiful light, and such a desire to capture it in a picture. I think though that sometimes it should be good enough to just enjoy the moment for what it is.

Republicans are "fuming". Sure they are.

This. So sick of seeing articles, hearing from the talking heads on the TV, about how many Republicans in Congress privately think Trump is terrible. I don’t give a damn what they think privately because it makes no difference. These are party-first clowns who accept what this President is doing. Not sure why members of our media keep creating these stories.

There were 3 children killed at Saugus HS

The author of this piece in the Washington Post keeps saying there were 2 victims. 2 children lost to gun violence. No, there were 3 children lost, the shooter himself was 16 years old. What lead this kid to this point, where he thought the solution to something was this?

3 kids. Not 2.

NYT: How the swing states view the impeachment process

The New York Times sent people to six of the swing states to get an idea of how these areas view the impeachment process and how it might affect the next election. In FL of the four people who they quoted two were white women in their 70s from The Villages. That area is about as pro-Trump as you can get. They couldn’t find anyone better in the whole state of Florida?

Hey “Anonymous” – tell us something we don’t know

Laughed this morning when I saw this headline for a Philip Rucker story on washingtonpost.com:

Book by ‘Anonymous’ official describes Trump as cruel, inept and a danger to the nation

Do we really need Anonymous to tell us this? It’s been pretty obvious since the day Trump took office.

On seeing Big Boy #4014

Everyone was gathered around the rail crossing waiting. People of all ages were parked in chairs or just standing around. The weather was still, the heat of the day being held back by the thin blanket of clouds. Everyone was anxiously waiting to see what would happen. The train was stopped further up the tracks, it’s journey temporarily halted. 

Then we heard them, the local news helicopters, the beat of the blades against the thick summer air unmistakable. This was a bit of history after all and they had to capture the moment for those who wouldn’t be able to see it in person. Hovering like dragonflies they also waited.

We could see it before we heard it, the smoke billowing from the smokestack, the headlight very bright even during the middle of the day, far down the tracks. A roar went up from the crowd as everyone saw it coming, the thing we had all gathered to see.

Then it was upon us, steam whistle blowing, belching smoke and steam as it thundered past us. The roar of the whistle was deafening and the million pounds of metal being driven forward by fire, pistons, and steam made the ground shake. We could feel it deep down in our bones, such a visceral experience, and one I hadn’t expected.

But as quickly as it had come it was gone. Everyone started leaving the spot where we had all experienced this little bit of history together, happy from the sight, sounds, and feel of it all. There was definitely an excitement in the air even bigger than what had been there before the train arrived. We had all been witness to the passing of this great machine and we all knew we were privileged to have been able to see it.

Big Boy #4014 was on it’s way to a weekend stop in West Chicago. It was built in 1941, one of 25 of the largest steam locomotives ever built. It was retired from service in 1961. Union Pacific purchased it from a railroad preservation group and set to work restoring it two years ago. Today’s journey was a part of the culmination of that work and I feel very lucky to have been able to see it.